How to Treat a Snake Bite

I’ve enjoyed most of the Rambo movies but there’s one scene that sticks in my mind, and has been parodied in the movie Hot Shots Part Deux! very well.

Yeah, it has to do with Rambo protecting himself from a snakebite. Unfortunately, not all of us can be like this reel-life icon as depicted in the tough guy one-man-army movies, and are susceptible to a snakebite especially if we are out in the jungle and on our own – with no prior experience.

In more cases than not, it becomes evident that you will not be able to escape the venom of a snake especially since it will catch you unawares with its speed and precision.

And since a snakebite is life-threatening, this means that you have to take steps to save yourself until you are able to find a hospital or even be able to find someone who can help you with a lasting cure.

Types of Snakebites
Usually there are two types of snakebites: venomous and non-venomous.

However, it is difficult for you to determine whether it is a venomous snakebite or not unless you use a particular method that will demonstrated in a video that you will find as a summary.

(Hint: It involves looking into the snake’s eyes… no fibbing here!)

Even though non-venomous snakebites are not life-threatening, they can be extremely painful for the person who has been bitten and can lead to infection later.

So you have ensure that you disinfect the wound with soap and water while also applying a disinfectant. Bandage it well so that any later infection is prevented. Remember to stay calm at all times…

How to treat a snakebite of the poisonous variety
So here are a few steps that you MUST keep in mind when dealing with a venomous snakebite:
Step #1: Get yourself or the person bitten away from the snake to prevent any additional snake bites.

Step #2: One important symptom of a venomous snakebite is the fact that the area swells up rapidly and severely. Ensure that you remove any constrictive clothing such as jewelry or clothing from the affected area.

Step #3: Ensure that the person rests as high activity increases blood flow, and the poison can spread faster throughout the body.

Step #4: Clean the wound with soap and water, and ensure that you tie a tight elastic bandage around the affected area so that you prevent blood from flowing to the heart but allowing blood to flow throughout the body from the heart.

Step #5: Very important, use a splint to restrict movement (to stop blood to the heart in doing this) of the affected area, especially since your legs are most susceptible to snakebites. Ensure that the level of affected area is kept below the heart even when in a resting position.

Step #6: Ensure that the victim is calm at all times, and if possible, give him or her to fluids to drink if they are conscious.

In Closing
Now watch this funny but information video which details out the steps by which you should treat a venomous snakebite especially if you are out.

Remember, as always, prevention is better than cure!

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • wapitihunter

    Whatever bleeding heart. Advice like that can kill people. Grow up or go find a titty and cry somewhere else.

  • Jr1776

    Slimey little rascals !

  • Evan Seelye

    I love it when told to “remain calm”! (yeah – right!). Almost got nailed by a rattlesnake – heard that unmistakable “Buzzz” and did a “straight-up” 12 ft. standing high jump! (LOL) Didn’t get bit, but it took almost 3 hrs for my heart rate to get back down to normal! That was even after killing the snake! Stay calm… right… after having the bejeepers scared out of you ?!?!?

  • Attilathehun

    We have all been bitten by a snake in the grass. The best antidote is to support Trump.

  • Troy Lundstrom

    You can use a Tip from a Archaeologist who works in the Deep Asian Jungle, they carry a Electric Stun gun, and literally Zap the bite effectively cooking and eliminating the effect of the poison. As weird as this sounds I seen it work on for A 2 week old Festering Spider bite which started healing with in hours of a 2 second Zap. It was a Brown Recluse Spider bite.

  • John D

    Is there any other kind?